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Badminton Net Play Training – Drills, Techniques and Shots

When playing badminton at the front net, it is best not to wave your arm. To play a higher quality of netplay at the front net, you should rely on the joint of the finger and the wrist to hit the shuttle. By doing so, you can even play a roll net shot.

When playing the low shot before the net, you need to do the appropriate stroke to push the shuttle. Your arm needs to match the wrist and finger to ensure that the shuttle can cross through the net smoothly.

In terms of power exertion, it is mainly for you to learn how to control the armed force to play it flexibly. At the same time, pay attention to the connection between the angle of the smash and the net height.

If you smash too low, the shuttle will be stuck on the net. If you smash too high, you will give a chance for your opponent to make a killing on you. When doing a netplay, you should pay attention not to force too much and cause the shuttle to get out of bounds.

Sometimes you can do a small force slightly, only let the shuttle have a large parabola in the air. The drop point is only about one meter after the net, where it will be very difficult for the opponent to receive the shot.

How to Deal With NetPlay?

No matter playing in what level of competition, if a player is not good or doesn’t know how to deal with netplay, he will find it difficult to play with his opponent proactively.

Also, this weakness can easily be caught by the opponent. When your opponent figures out you cannot playing good netplay, they will assault you rigorously in front of the net.

Netplay is an important technique to mobilize your opponent and is for you to find a good opportunity to score in a rally. Because the technical movement is soft and delicate, and the power required to control the shot is moderate.

When practicing netplay, you need to pay attention to the action specifications. You should carefully feel the small feelings of the wrists and fingers when making the shot.

Forehand netplay

When the opponent hits the shuttle to the forehand in front of the net, you can use the forehand grip to gently cut and lob the shuttle with the racket. The shuttle will bounce just right to cross the net and falls straight.

You need to turn your body sideways and move toward the shuttle to perform such a playing technique. Slightly leans forward of your upper body, and the right hand grips the racket in front of the body. The final step is the footwork movement that you have to move the right foot in the direction where the shuttle coming.

It would help if you lunged over to the net, and the body’s pivot needs to be higher. The forearm needs to stretches toward the shuttle, and it should be lifted forward and upward slightly diagonally against the net.

You can try to strive for a net kill where you can relax the wrist and strike or chop the side of the cork base of the shuttle. During the stroke, you should lift the left hand back to coordinate the movement.

The strength, speed, and angle of the racket face for you to do the swing are mainly determined by the distance and speed of the shuttle coming over. When the shuttle is far from the net, the speed is faster. The force of the shuttle is also more powerful. After doing the netplay, you need to return to the ready stance right away.

Backhand netplay

The technique for you to do the backhand netplay is similar to the forehand. It is just the direction is of the opposite.

For doing the backhand netplay, you will grip the racket and do the shot with your backhand. When hitting the shuttle, it mainly relies on the stretch and external rotation of the arm and the strength of the wrist. Toss the bottom of the cork base to hit the shuttle and make just right to cross the net. After making the shot, return to the ready stance to get ready for the next shot.

Net Chop

Forehand net chop

Before doing the net chop with your forehand, you need to rotate your arm slightly, and the wrist is slightly stretched from the back to the inside. When making the shot, you do a fast swing of the racket in front of the net. Chop the shuttle at its bottom right to make it rolled across the net.

Backhand net chop

Before doing the net chop with your backhand, you need to rotate your arm slightly, and the wrist is slightly stretched from the back to the inside. Chop the bottom right of the shuttle to make it rolled across the net.

In addition, you can slightly straighten the arm, and the wrist is slightly stretched from the back to the inside. Grip the racket and lunge forward to chop the bottom right of the shuttle and make it rolled across the net.

While doing the net chop, most players tend to make a mistake as follows:

  1. The grip is too tight, and the movement is stiff. This can cause bouncing the shuttle and not chopping the shuttle.
  2. You are overacting by chopping and cutting the shuttle with the forearm.
  3. Chop the wrong part of the shuttle, which causes the shuttle not to spin.
  4. The palm of the grip is not empty, which causes the shuttle not to get twist while hitting.

Net Push

Forehand straight line net push

Get ready in front of the net. When the shuttle coming over in your direction, you should lift the racket to the right. The elbow joint is slightly flexed, the arm is slightly rotated, the wrist is slightly extended, the racket is slightly tilted to the right, and the racket face is facing the shuttle.

The little finger and the ring finger are slightly loosened. This will make the handle leave the palm muscles slightly. The thumb and forefinger slightly move the handle outwards, and the racket face is at the reclined position.

Forehand diagonal net push

The techniques of doing the diagonal forehand net push are like the straight line forehand net push. The difference is when hitting the shuttle, the hitting point is in front of the right shoulder, and to push at the right rear area of the shuttle.

By doing so, the shuttle will fly in the diagonal direction. The wrist controls the angle of the racket face, and the arm should not be fully stretch when the wrist is flashed.

Backhand straight line net push

It would be best to make the shot from the higher hitting point in front of the net. Using the push technique to hit the shuttle faster to the opponent’s bottom line with the backhand grip.

The forearm stretches slightly outward; the wrist stretches from outward to the straight flash wrist—the middle finger, ring finger, and little finger grip the handle. The thumb presses the racket, swings forward, and pushes the left side of the shuttle.

Backhand diagonal net push

The backhand diagonal net push is like the backhand straight line net push. The difference is that you need to swiftly swing the racket to the right front at the moment of hitting the shuttle. Then push the left rear part of the shuttle to cross over the net diagonally.

Net Hook

Forehand diagonal net hook

The forearm stretched forward and rotated slightly outward. The wrist slightly stretched to the back, then the grip slightly changed. The handle will be slightly tilted so that the thumb is attached to the wide surface of the handle.

The second knuckle of the index finger is attached to the wide area of the back of the handle, and the handle does not touch the palm. The racket is swing forward to the right, and the face facing the front of the opponent’s right net.

When hitting the shuttle, the forearm is slightly rotated to the left. The wrist is stretched from the inside. Do the push at the lower right part of the shuttle to make the shuttle fly diagonally along with the net.

When you hit the shuttle, your wrist should control the angle of the racket’s face. After hitting the shuttle, return to the ready stance.

Backhand diagonal net hook

Grip the racket with your backhand, swing the racket by stretching your forearm. In the process of moving your body forward, the racket should lower down with the arm. And the backhand grip is changed to make the backhand hook.

At this time, the racket face is facing the incoming shuttle. When the shuttle passes over the net, you need to lower your elbow and slightly rotate the forearm. The wrist is slightly flexed to the rear to stretch the wrist.

The inner side of the thumb and the middle finger pull the handle to the right. The other fingers grip the handle tight. Push the left rear area of the shuttle to make it cross the net diagonally.

Net Rush

Quickly press the shuttle that is flying higher than the net is call net rush. When hitting the shuttle, the racket head is tilted, the forearm drives the wrist and the finger to exert quickly. The racket needs to pull back immediately after the shot to avoid fouling on the net.

When doing net rush, it is required for you to make precise judgments. Your move needs to be fast, the rushing point should be high, and the action is small.

Net rush can be divided into two types: forehand and backhand. And the route is straight, diagonal, and complementary.

The net rush is a big threat in badminton netplay. The key to do the net rush is “fast.” First depends on the judgment. Once judged, it is required to start fast and lunge or jump to the net. At the same time, the shot is fast. You need to grab the chance when the shuttle is at the highest point on the net and do the killing shot right away.

While you are leaping in the air or your right foot is lunging, the forearm is lifted forward, and the racket faces the shuttle.

When hitting the shuttle, the arm is flexed and stretched. The wrist is stretched from the back to the front and makes the killing shot.

The wrist is the key to control the power. The swing distance is short, the action is small, and the explosive power is huge.

If the shuttle is closer to the net’s top, use the “sliding” net rush. Press the shuttle from the left with your wrist to avoid the foul of the racket. After doing the net rush, pay attention to the cushion on the leg and control the pivot to prevent the body from touching the net.

Backhand net rush

Grip the racket at your backhand and held it in front of the left side. When jumping or lunging to the net, the racket is lifted with the forearm forward, the wrist is slightly bent, the thumb is pressed against the handle surface, the other four fingers are naturally close together, and the racket face is facing the shuttle.

The arm stretches when hitting the shuttle, the wrist is stretched, and the thumb is pressed. This will speed up the net rush. After hitting the shuttle, the racket is immediately pull back to the front of the body.

Common mistakes when doing net rush

Most people are moving too much and take a long time to swing. So they didn’t manage with the right timing and foul by touching the net when doing net rush.

There is no flashing motion on the wrist which makes the shuttle lack a downward drop. This can easily cause the bottom line to be out of bounds.

Neglected the leg. The net rush makes your whole body push to the front. Beginners often only pay attention to the movements of the hands and ignore the cushioning action of the legs after hitting the ball, thus easily causing fouls.

Net Lob

Forehand net lob

Doing a net lob with your forehand needs preparation in advance. The forearm is twisted before hitting the shuttle, and the wrist is stretched as far as possible.

When hitting the shuttle, swing from the bottom to the front of the right or left. On this basis, if the racket is swung to the top right, the lob is of straight clear; if the racket is swung to the left, the lob is diagonal high clear.

Backhand net lob

Before hitting the shuttle, pull the elbow to the back of the right arm. The forearm is fully rotated when hitting the shuttle, and the wrist is stretched to the back. Then swing the racket to do the shot.

If the racket is swung from the lower left to the upper front, the shuttle will fly in a straight line; if the shuttle is swung from the lower left to the upper right, the shuttle will fly diagonally.

If you do not properly use wrists and fingers, you may have excessive force or poor control of the racket surface. This will result in hitting the shuttle too high, too far, or of the net. If you stand too close to the net, it may hinder you from hitting.

Half-Court Shot

The techniques of half-court shot can be roughly categorized into blocking a net shot, lifting high clear, drive, and quick shot.

Blocking net shot

Forehand blocking net shot from the straight line

This technique is mostly used to receive the shot from the opponent. Before receiving the shuttle, move your body to the right sideline. The body is tilted to the right, the arm stretches to the right, the forearm rotates outward, and the wrist stretches out.

The forearm rotates slightly when hitting the shuttle, and the wrist pulls the racket to push the shuttle from the lower right to the front. Blocking the shuttle and let it go straight to the front of the net.

The forearm can be rotated from the outside to the inside when hitting the shuttle. The racket is driven forward from the right to the net in a straight line.

After hitting the shuttle, the body turns left to face the net. Then the right footsteps one step forward. The racket turns left to the front with the body.

Forehand blocking net shot from cross-court

The ready stance is the same as the forehand blocking a net shot from the straight line.
When you swing your racket to hit the shuttle, the forearm is slightly rotated, the elbow is flexed, and the wrist is stretched from the back to the right. The hitting point is on the front right side. The wrist and fingers control the angle of the racket face to make the shuttle fall diagonally to the opposite net.

Backhand blocking net shot from the straight line

It is the same as the forehand and is mostly used to receive the shot. First, use the footsteps of receiving shot to move your body to the sideline of the left court. The body turns left and leans forward, the right shoulder is facing the net, the right elbow is bent, the wrist is stretch outward, and do a backswing to the front of the left shoulder.

When hitting the shuttle, get the momentum from the opponent’s shot. The front arm drives the racket from the upper left to the front left and swings. Use the thumb power to hit the cork base and block the shuttle back in a straight line to the opposite net. After hitting the shuttle, the body turns right into the front-facing net, and the racket is taken to the front of the body as the body moves.

Forehand blocking net shot from cross-court

When hitting the shuttle, the wrist is stretched outward to the back. Swing the racket to hit the lower-left area of the shuttle so the shuttle will fall diagonally to the opposite net.

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